Fostering Positive Behaviour at Your Dental Practice

In my line of work, I am often asked about the challenges of running a dental practice. Dentistry is a wonderful profession, but let’s face it – no field is without its unique set of hurdles. Running a successful practice is part art, part science and part skill. But no matter how gifted or skilled a dentist might be, his or her practice is made up of people.

And so, one of the biggest challenges of running a great practice is understanding those people, and their behaviours.

ABELDent’s dental software program has easy to use features such as our appointment scheduler and automated patient communication. Although they help keep dental schedules organized and patients informed, keeping your staff effective and motivated requires strategies and actions that elicit the responses you desire.

Workplace behaviour is a growing topic of conversation in dentistry, and every year there is more and more emphasis on implementing positive change. Changing behaviour patterns in any workplace can be tough, but with the right attitude, even the most pervasive negative behaviours can be curbed.

Let’s take a look at 3 common behaviour issues common to many dental clinics – and then let’s consider how to turn the problems around.

1. Smartphone Use

You might be frustrated when your staff are constantly distracted by their smartphones, and wondering how to fix the issue. Smartphones aren’t going anywhere anytime soon, but there are ways to curb use in the office.

One solution is to limit use to certain windows of time, such as on breaks or during lunch. You might also put a ban on cellphones in meetings, at reception, in restrooms or in high-traffic areas. Whatever limitations you impose, a written policy that employees have to read and sign is the best way to curb the problem, as that leaves little room for misinterpretation.

When your employees follow these rules, acknowledge their improvement. Identifying and broadcasting good news is a great way to foster positive change. While disciplinary action may be required if someone repeatedly refuses to put their phone away, rewarding staff who do comply will go a long way. A great reward might be to reduce the smartphone limitations over time, allowing for more liberal use once the staff has shown initial discipline.

2. Negative Attitudes

This one can’t always be helped – some people just have bad days. The important thing to reinforce to your staff is that negativity is contagious, and that a bad attitude will affect everyone, including the patients.

When you notice positive workplace behaviour, it’s important to recognize, acknowledge, and even reward it. On the other hand, when you see undesirable behaviour, be sure to address it right away. If someone’s bad mood is having a noticeable effect, it’s important to deal with and confront this type of negative workplace behaviour head-on.

Don’t be afraid to sympathize with the person if they are dealing with a real problem – but also don’t be afraid to remind them to be professional and leave their personal issues at home.

Dental Team Manager.jpg

3. Lazy Management

If you want your staff to be engaged and to offer the best possible patient experience, you need to ensure that your management team is equally engaged. Helping improve workplace behaviour takes effort, and your management team will need to take an active role.

It’s imperative that your staff feel empowered to succeed. Providing top down feedback is great, but when management actually takes the time to coach their staff, there is much more room for improvement. Management should set distinct goals and deliverables and then acknowledge and reward staff as they reach various benchmarks, not simply when the larger goal is reached.

Also, consider scheduling customer service training from a third party that has experience working with dental offices. They can provide an objective validation of the customer experience you wish to achieve as well as offer the expertise necessary for successful implementation of your office policies. The training sessions can also serve as a great team building experience and ensure everyone is on the same page.

When your staff feel that management wants them to succeed, they will embrace the pride and satisfaction that often comes along with facing new and exciting challenges.

Be Patient

I completely understand the desire to see positive change happen quickly. But in reality, as research shows, you’re more likely to see success when you take it slow. Set smaller benchmarks to success, and reward staff that make a real effort.

Behavioural theory suggests that there are a variety of stages associated with embracing change, so make sure that your employees have the time they need to go through the stages. This kind of focus and care will result in positive, permanent changes that will be noticeable to everyone at your practice.

If you are clear about the issues while also allowing your employees the time to slowly turn it around, you might be surprised at how many people will fall into the new system. It just takes time.

It’s been said that positive verbal praise and feedback stimulate the same parts of the brain that receiving money stimulates. When positive behaviour is cultivated and shared, it’s more likely to be repeated – and it doesn’t cost a penny!

How Web-based Dental Solutions Protect Against Cyberscamming

Dental clinicians and practitioners face a unique set of challenges day in and day out, from ensuring patient satisfaction to staying on top of technological advancements in the field to maintaining a steady income stream in a increasingly competitive environment.

But a dental practice also faces the hurdle of keeping its staff and patients connected, which exposes them to an altogether different struggle – that of keeping data secure in an age when scammers are working harder than ever to compromise patient information.

The protection and organization of data is a serious matter, and so I’m starting the new year by bringing you up to speed on the rise of phishing and other cyberscamming attempts.

cyberscam protection

Below, I discuss recent scams both in and out of the field of dentistry, and provide some tactics to help you defend yourself.

Gone Phishing

Phishing is the act of impersonating legitimate companies through email or phone contact in an attempt to lure staff or consumers themselves into divulging private, personal information.

Emails will often ask for login credentials and other personal info to solve a vague but urgent problem. Scammers go to great lengths to make the request seem legitimate, which works to build a false sense of security in victims.

The CRA Scam

Consider the recent CRA scam that has already affected 4,000 victims who have lost more than $15 million. This scam takes the form of a call from someone claiming to be from the Canada Revenue Agency, who then threatens victims with arrest for owing back taxes. The scammers will often demand payment in the form of gift cards, cybercurrency, wire transfers or other unorthodox methods of payment.

Up the Amazon Without a Paddle

Meanwhile, the RCMP are issuing warnings about a phishing scam targeting Amazon customers. The police warn about emails sent to customers regarding purchases they never made, complete with receipts of purchase and shipping addresses. By clicking on the ‘details’ button, emails direct victims to a fake Amazon login page that then attempts to steal credit card information.

Cyberscams with Teeth

The dental industry is not impervious to these threats, either. In 2015, an Oregon dental services company reported that a hacker had breached their system, accessing the information of more than 151,000 patients. The pinched data included patient names, social security numbers, phone numbers and addresses, as well as birth dates.

The hackers leveraged malware in order to obtain an employee’s username and password which gave them access to the company’s membership database.

protection from hackers

Protect Yourself

I can hear you asking, how do I protect myself against these threats? If you want to keep your personal or financial records safe from scammers, this simple but effective list of considerations will really help keep your info safe from compromise.

  • Don’t reply to any email that requests you to enter your personal or financial information
  • Check the hyperlink by hovering your mouse over the link to verify the address. If the email claims to be coming from Aeroplan, verify that the site is indeed Aeroplan.com or .ca
  • Contact your bank or financial institution immediately if the email or phone call claims that you owe money. Banks compile info on these scams and reporting the incident can help bring down the predators
  • Get in touch with Equifax or TransUnion to place a fraud alert on your name if you suspect you might be the victim of attempted identity theft

If you run a dental practice, and you’re worried about keeping your financial records, patient files, schedules, and other documents secure, it pays to partner with a company that understands the nuances of cybercrime.

Servers aren’t always secure, and your digital dental office staff are only human and are not invulnerable to sophisticated phishing scams, so it pays to add another layer of defence. Services are available that offer safe encryption of your data and advanced cloud storage. Data is protected from attacks but can quickly be restored with up to date backups if necessary.

If you feel that you are the target of a cyberscam, take your time and remember to be cautious. When dealing with any company, including a government agency like the CRA, you have the right to request written information, ask for a call back number, and demand time to think over the situation. A real company will be trying to solve a problem, and will show patience. Scammers around the world are all the same – they will want to part you from your money as soon as possible.

And if you run a dental practice, remember that safe, reliable web based dental solutions are available and becoming increasingly the platform of choice.

 

Reducing Anxiety is the Key to Patient Retention

Identify and Reduce Common Causes of Dental Anxiety

Understanding Positive Patient Perception Will Help You Grow Your Practice

If you are a fan of Netflix or enjoy a night out at the movies, you’ve probably noticed that dentists aren’t often portrayed kindly in popular media.

The movie industry still clings to the cliché of dentists as villains – just look at Horrible Bosses, where Jennifer Aniston plays a crazed dental practitioner who gleefully tortures her patients and staff, or horror films like The Dentist or its sequel.

These portrayals are unfortunate because most dentists, and their team members, are actually quite amiable and likeable. Personally I can say that at the dental clinic where I receive care they routinely share little anecdotes and we have some good laughs.

Any dental practice in the know recognizes the importance of patient perception and will address and even reverse the all-too-popular assumption that the dentist’s office is a place to fear.

Dental industry experts tell us that the most common reasons given by patients for not routinely visiting the dentist are:

  • Communication issues
  • Failure to address concerns over the cost of dental care, and
  • A lack of appreciation for patient anxiety

If you run a dental practice and you want to ensure that your patients not only return for future work, but also return for regular preventative care – and not just to deal with a crisis – you need to address these concerns.

Improving Communication

Effective communication is essential for creating positive perceptions, and improving communication is easy – if you know what people want. Most patients appreciate a health care professional that speaks to them, not at them. By reducing your reliance on technical jargon and by presenting information clearly, you can significantly improve your patients’ overall experience. After all, the more aware they are of your administrative and clinical processes, the more comfortable they’ll be.

You can also work on improving the non-verbal communication skills of your dentists and support staff to increase patient retention. It’s a dentist’s office after all, so make sure everyone’s smiling!

Addressing Concerns about Cost

Many patients reporting negative reactions to their dental experience say the care was satisfactory but are unhappy with the cost. This is especially true in countries like Canada where many other forms of healthcare are fully or partially funded publicly.

One way to help patients understand the cost-to-benefit ratio of dental work is to explain the treatment process, the breakdown of the individual services you are providing, and the consequences of not proceeding with the required treatment. For Millennials, who tend to be more budget savvy, spend time educating them during their decision-making process to help them understand the reasoning behind your recommendations.

Dealing with Dental Anxiety

Fear of the dentist has been reported as the second most common phobia – second only to public speaking – and every dental patient experiences some degree of anxiety.

To help alleviate this anxiety, remember that comfort is key. Go the extra mile to establish an open and caring relationship with patients, especially those under the age of 12. Coloured glasses can help reduce the glare of the bright lights above the dental chair and can add a bit of fun to the experience, while having TVs spread about the office can give both kids and adults a happy distraction.

Reduce Appointment Jitters

Patients are already anxious enough about going to the dentist, and they don’t want their appointments continually cancelled or postponed. Running a dental clinic should never be viewed as chaotic, and ABELDent’s automated patient communication and other dental scheduling software can help keep you organized – which will help reduce patient anxiety, and keep them coming back for future care.

Don’t let the Hollywood media define you! Address these common patient concerns and watch your practice grow and patient satisfaction increase!

Patient Satisfaction by the Numbers

Have you ever sat in a waiting room tapping your fingers, hoping each time the Nurse appears that your name will be called? Definitely been there, definitely hoped that.

Have you ever noticed that even as a Doctor or Practice Manager yourself, your level of overall satisfaction decreases in direct proportion to your wait time? That after around 10 minutes, your mind starts to calculate the cost of your wasted time? Do you start to issue imaginary invoices to the provider for your own time? I’ve done that as well.

According to recent research conducted by Software Advice, the average wait time in a dental office is 13.5 minutes. Of the over 5,000 patients surveyed, 97% reported frustration with the time they were expected to wait for a pre-booked appointment.

Further, the study found a real co-relation between wait times and patient satisfaction. When patients have to wait for the Hygienist they are more likely to be dissatisfied, but when the provider is earlier than expected patients are both more satisfied and more likely to follow the treatment plan.

Other than mastering the arts of accurate scheduling, streamlined patient processing and efficient clinical work, there is not a lot you can do to avoid delays. Some patients will always be late. Others may take longer than anticipated to treat. Emergencies, cancellations, staff absences… your days rarely unfold exactly as planned.

So while you cannot always control wait times, what you can work on is altering your patients’ perception of the length of their wait. Here are a few suggestions that might help you do that:

  • Create a pleasant atmosphere with comfortable seating.
  • Music and magazines have always been standard. Adding a TV monitor can have a big impact on patient entertainment.
  • Offering complimentary beverages is always appreciated. Bottled water is a great option: simple, refreshing and healthy.
  • Most patients today will keep themselves occupied with their mobile devices. So make sure you offer WiFi – independent of your practice’s access for security purposes – and clearly post login information.
  • Acknowledge patients upon arrival.
  • Communicate wait times whenever possible. 80% of patients say they would feel less frustrated if they were told expected wait times in advance.
  • Manage wait times carefully. Checking back, asking questions, offering an update will make the time seem to have passed more quickly. Rely on practice management software that tracks appointment status, wait times and patient alerts to draw your team’s attention so they can take immediate action to reduce the negative impact of waiting.
  • Use your portal to advise patients via text of any delay expected to exceed 15 minutes.
  • Also use your portal to allow patients to pre-populate and update their personal information and health histories. They will appreciate that you have created a system to help reduce their wait times.
  • Maximize the capabilities of your software to use electronic forms, have patient information at your fingertips and capture real-time data throughout the appointment.
  • Regularly analyze your data to identify and address trends to reduce wait times. Good practice management software tracks the entire patient visit from arrival to departure, giving you the opportunity to learn from recurring issues and specific bottleneck situations.

For the most part, we have all come to expect some degree of wait time when visiting a Dentist or Doctor. You can differentiate your practice by minimizing the impact of the wait, to the delight and surprise of your patients.

 

ABELDent Keeps You Informed on Digital Dental Office Solutions

Consult our Simple, Straightforward Guide to Building the Perfect Facebook Group

As a follow-up to our October article about using Facebook to promote your dental practice, here is a new article that will show you how to harness the power of Facebook groups to better engage and connect directly with your patients.

At ABELDent, we know how to connect dental practitioners to the right dental practice management software and the tools they need to increase productivity, but we also know how to connect to people – which is why we’re confident the insights presented in this guide will help you build a better practice.

Consult our Simple, Straightforward Guide to Building the Perfect Facebook Group

What to Know Before You Start

Understanding patient needs is the most important pillar of any healthcare practice, and being able to connect directly with those patients is the first step toward building a lasting relationship.

You probably already know that owning the customer experience is the key to marketing any brand on social media. But if you really want your dental practice to stand out from the competition, you need to understand how these platforms actually handle user experience, and where your individual brand fits into the equation.

These days, companies compete first and foremost on the basis of customer experience (according to Forbes, 89% of companies list it as their primary metric for success). Like any other type of customer, dental patients use how they feel about the service you’re offering to decide whether or not they will keep doing business with your brand – or engage with that brand in the first place.

This is why companies in the know have begun to use the community-building nature of Facebook groups as a backdoor into deeper connections with potential and returning customers. The experience of being connected to a community paves the way to brand interaction, and Facebook privileges and promotes this kind of organic interaction.

Think about it. At the start of 2018, Facebook needed to change the way its News Feed functioned, and so they tweaked the algorithm – the code that decides what information to present to users and what information to deprioritize – to promote more posts from family and friends, while demoting content posted by brands, businesses, and media outlets.

While the new algorithm actively pushes followers away from traditional ad campaigns, it simultaneously rewards businesses that connect to users by building vibrant group communities.

Tip #1 – Find your Niche

Facebook groups are great at bringing together people who share a common interest. Creating a group dedicated to spreading dental health awareness, for example, might attract Facebook users who have similar oral health questions, or who want to learn more about local dentistry options in their city.

This gives you ample opportunities to improve awareness of yourself and your dental care brand simply by being helpful and informative.

Tip #2 – Engage with your Members

Posting and engaging with your group members goes a long way to building your numbers (just ask social media marketing expert Neil Patel, whose own Facebook group has over 11,000 members)!

More than just a controllable asset, a Facebook group is a hub – a space for people to gather, share, and discuss – which influences users in a far bigger way than a Facebook page alone.

People need answers to their questions, and if you are able to offer consistent solutions, you will see patient communication within your group soar, especially as people start to share the experience with friends and family on the platform, driving more attention to your brand. You can start by offering simple dental hygiene tips related to proper brushing and flossing techniques, the benefits of teeth whitening, and the importance of routine visits to the dentist. Once you’ve solidified your brand’s status, you can then begin to suggest specific services, such as those offered by your practice.

If you’ve been consistently providing answers to oral health questions, you can slowly begin to recommend that people stop by your clinic to learn more, turning Facebook engagement into potential business.

Tip #3 – Commit Yourself

If you’re thinking about starting a Facebook group for your dental clinic, or you want to improve the group you’ve already started, you need to put some time and energy into the endeavour. Remember the following:

  1. Be informative. Let the world know what your group is about. Write a great intro blurb in the About section to get people interested. This is your elevator pitch, so make those characters count.
  2. Be welcoming. Create a pinned post anytime a new person joins your group, welcoming them aboard and inviting them to introduce themselves. People who feel like they belong are more likely to participate and engage with your content.
  3. Be encouraging. Talk to existing customers in your group routinely, and encourage them to post positive reviews or testimonials. This will allow you to highlight patient experiences for others to see and share.
  4. Be present. Make sure you commit to giving your group members a piece of your time every day. It might not be the most ‘scalable’ use of your half-hour, but you need to be present in the group to get members to believe in you and your brand.

There you have it! Hopefully you can use this guide to create the perfect Facebook group that will allow you to position yourself and your brand in a more visible space, find new customers, and bring more attention to your dental practice.

At ABELDent, we routinely publish informative pieces on all things related to dentistry software and dentistry itself, so be sure to check in on the blog regularly!

Practical HR Best Practices for your Practice

I have been working recently alongside our Human Resources Consultant, updating our Associate Handbook to accommodate the seemingly ever-changing provincial employment standards. It has really reinforced for me the importance of having well defined, current policies in place.

The exercise also got me wondering: How many of our dental practice management software users have a handbook for their employees? Regardless of size, every company can benefit from adopting this best practice.

A handbook serves a multitude of purposes, it:

  • Documents your well-thought-out policies that should then be applied to all team members equally.
  • Helps onboard new employees.
  • Serves as a guideline when behaviours need to be addressed and adjusted.
  • Provides a foundation for end-of-employment decisions.
  • Can help demonstrate your commitment to compliance and consistency to government auditors, lawyers, or Human Rights Tribunals.

In the busy day-to-day of a dental practice, HR matters can easily get pushed to the bottom of the priority list. Well-meaning intentions get brushed aside… right up until a significant event brings your policies – or lack thereof – into the spotlight. It’s then that you might regret not having taken action sooner. Here are a few things you can think about now that might spare you the regret. And the grief. And the legal fees. And the fines…

  • The final straw syndrome
    It happens all too frequently. A Manager makes the decision that she can no longer tolerate poor job performance or undesirable behaviour and terminates her employee. After the fact, she learns about the risk of wrongful dismissal.

Precaution: establish and follow a progressive discipline process. Make the employee aware of specific issues and give the employee an opportunity to improve. Follow one verbal notice with at least two written notices.

  • I’ll get to it later…
    It is never easy to have to correct behaviour with reprimands and criticism. What is easier is procrastinating and hoping the situation will improve itself. Chances are good that it will not. After two or three instances, the dates, times and specifics become blurred.

Precaution: Develop an empathetic, professional approach to delivering constructive criticism, and teach it to all supervisory staff. Identify and communicate issues early. People are usually receptive to feedback when it is delivered earnestly and fairly, when it focuses on behaviours rather than attitudes, and when there is benefit to self-improvement. Document your conversations to keep track of details.

  • When NOT to be constructive
    Sometimes, it can be easier for a Manager to avoid confrontation with an underperforming employee by reassigning them to a junior role, significantly changing their role or work conditions, or simply making their life difficult in the hopes that they will resign. In employment law, this is constructive dismissal.

Precaution: Don’t do that.

  • Job creep
    This is a common phenomenon in dental practices: You hire an excellent Office Manager who becomes your go-to person worth their weight in gold. Over time, this person takes on more and more responsibility and an ever-increasing variety of functions, and manages to do it all in a 40-hour workweek. When this employee resigns, the practice cannot expect to fill all the ‘hats’ with one hire.

Precaution: Create clear Job Descriptions for every role in your practice. Do not allow any one person to become indispensable; develop succession plans through effective work distribution and cross training. A smart system of checks and balances also helps mitigate fraudulent activity. This is one objective of a built-on software feature like ABELDent’s Authorization Manager.

  • When is an employee not an employee?
    Engaging Consultants to bring complementary skills, knowledge and talent into your practice is a great way to grow your business. Companies need to be aware, however, of the criteria that differentiate an employee from a contractor. Significant fines apply to an employer – yes, the onus is on the employer – when a misclassification occurs.

Precaution: Consult Canada Revenue Agency for clear definitions. 

  • Too little, too late
    How many employers have regretfully accepted the resignation of a star employee who did not realize how much they were valued, or was unaware that a correction or a promotion was “in the works“?

Precaution: Maintain a connection with each team member. Start today. Whether through annual performance appraisals or informal quarterly chats, enable healthy two-way dialogue.

I apply the advice of our staff HR Consultant in my day-to-day operations and truly champion the foundational philosophies: Hire the right people, focus on the fit. Train and retrain, clearly defining purpose, expectations and performance measurements.

Never underestimate the value of communication in running a business: Praise when earned, thanks when deserved, feedback when warranted. Ask your team for input and ideas, and listen to their perspectives.

If your practice could benefit from more pragmatic advice like this, customized HR solutions and proactive support, give me a call. I know someone who can help!

People management may seem intuitive, but don’t most things with the benefit of 20/20 hindsight?

Bad Press? You’re a Doctor… Spin It!

We often hear that there is no such thing as “bad” press. The fact that someone is talking about you at all is considered a good thing, right? It can place you in the spotlight for a fleeting moment and give you the opportunity to right a wrong. Misfortune may befall, and mistakes will be made. The fallout is usually brief; it’s how you deal with it can help you win friends and influence others.

There have always been forums for patients to voice complaints and, of course, regulatory bodies for serious claims. But in today’s culture of sharing the most mundane of activities and trivial opinions on social media, the exposure is magnified. People are increasingly post-happy, looking to provoke controversy in search of their 15 minutes of fame.

Within this climate, it is only prudent to develop a plan for damage control. Like back-up and recovery of your data in the event of cybercrime or catastrophe, reputation management requires an ounce of prevention.

Essentially, it’s the patient experience itself that becomes your best risk mitigator. One of the wisest things you and your team can do is ask for patient feedback after each appointment. Did we meet your expectations? Is there anything we could improve to make you more satisfied? Especially if your team has tracked the patient’s appointment in your practice management software and has used the information in real time to smooth out any glitches, feedback is valuable.

Post-appointment surveys can be even more effective; they open lines of communication and keep you top-of-mind. They provide an equal opportunity for positive feedback which can be used (with permission) as a testimonial. A survey also opens the door to ask for referrals. The important thing is to ask for feedback and make it easy for your patients to give it.

In the case of a clinical error or unfortunate outcome, you would likely be immediately aware of the situation and able to work with your patient towards resolution. In the case of dissatisfaction with service or other issues, however, you may never have the opportunity for direct communication. And either case could go viral before you even break for lunch.

For a business, receiving a complaint – or worse, reading about one directed at your practice – can be shocking. The natural first reaction is emotional: we get angry, insulted, defensive. Some respond by immediately firing back an angry tweet.

Don’t do that. Instead:

  1. Give it time. In 24 hours, emotions will fade, and you can focus on facts. Make sure that your staff is aware of this advice.
  2. Assemble your facts. If warranted, involve relevant staff. Use your practice management software history for details. Make the exercise about fact-finding, not blame-seeking.
  3. Respond to your challenger using the same channel. Thank the patient for taking the time to communicate. “Your feedback helps us understand and address how patients perceive our service.”
  4. There is usually no need to apologize. “We are sorry you feel that way.” is a good way to validate feelings without accepting fault.
  5. Depending on the patient and the complaint, you might consider inviting the person to contact you directly to offer their perspective for improvement.
  6. Again, depending on the patient and the complaint, a personal phone call might be warranted, instead of or in addition to the above.
  7. Finally, there are situations where you are best advised to simply defer to your lawyer.

It seems unjust that one negative incident can outweigh the scores of positive interactions and examples of exceptional service you provide on a daily basis. Alas, the rule of asymmetrical rewards can apply in dentistry as much as in any customer-facing company.

Here is some food for thought to address the imbalance:

  • It is healthy to acknowledge your feelings. Criticism stings. Any Psychologist – and any mother – will assure you that “Nobody’s perfect” and “You can’t please everybody all of the time”. In fact, the principle of the pratfall effect validates the idea that infallibility is endearing. Flaws can make an individual more likable and less intimidating.
  • You – and your practice – have supporters. In the event of bad press, you may discover loyal patients inspired to voluntarily rally to your defence. I described in a recent post some of the steps you can take to improve your Facebook and social media presence… asking for testimonials is one of them. Let the occasional negative item get lost in a sea of praise. And the more digital presence you create, the more search engine prominence gets placed on space you control.
  • Remember the power of the self-fulfilling prophecy, also known as the Pygmalion effect. It’s helpful to keep this principle in mind so that you – and your staff – do not allow a minor complaint to build out of proportion.
  • Finally, count on the spotlight effect. Although an overblown bad review about a trivial matter can still seem earth shattering, the fact is that in most cases, an isolated bit of bad press is not noticed as much as we think.

I am not a Psychologist, but I am a mother, and I learned from the best. I also found inspiration and data for this post in an article by Rebekah Bernard in Medical Economics, and another by Kevan Lee, Director of Marketing at Buffer. When it comes to the power of positive thinking, I’ll take the half-full glass every time. Cheers!