Are you Living your Vision, Mission and Values?

Audience fragmentation is a challenge that marketers have been grappling with for some time. Consumers can no longer be pigeon-holed into a few contact channels: They are increasingly adventurous, capricious, demanding, and armed with information. Just when you think you’ve built a toehold on a social media site like Facebook, the early adopters have already moved on to the next shiny thing.

Consumers want to understand what you stand for, but they also want you to understand what makes them tick. Increasingly, they expect responsiveness, interactivity and customization.

Dental professionals cannot ignore these trends. The current environment for attracting new patients is competitive to the point where clinical expertise and caring service are just part of the equation.

Market differentiation is necessary to fuel momentum. A practice that can define and clearly articulate what unique advantages they offer to their patients can often move the needle from surviving to thriving.

In ABELDent’s Practice Management by Objectives™ methodology, the development of a meaningful Value Proposition is fundamental to a solid business strategy. There’s a mutual underpinning between the Value Proposition, the Mission, the Vision and Values statements, and the Operating Plan. Learn more about Practice Management by Objectives™.

If you have not yet articulated your thinking on this, your Mission is a good place to start. It should describe:
a. Why you are in business
b. Who you serve
c. How your practice adds value or improves the life of those you serve

Next, explore your Vision:
a. How do you define success, both short and long term
b. How will you and your practice improve, grow and prosper over the next several years

Finally, identify your Values:
a. What’s your patient care philosophy
b. What principles and qualities are important to you
c. What behaviours model those principles

This exercise is both a personal exploration and a team exercise. In order to create a shared vision and encourage buy-in, all staff and stakeholders could be involved. Your operating processes, practices and systems evolve from this foundation. And so will the emotional connections you create with your existing and new patients.

Working hard – or hardly working?

According to a recent McKinsey report, today’s workforce spends 61% of their time managing work, rather than actually doing it.

Does that strike a chord? It did for me, even though my job as a people manager is to deal with and eliminate bureaucracy so my team can focus on achieving their goals. But I hear the lament over and over that others are drowning in administrative tasks, battling red tape and knee-deep in paperwork (online demands included). Today, the biggest complaint seems to revolve around the overwhelming email bog.

I’ve heard of companies creating ’email-free’ days where all internal business must happen over the telephone or gasp! in person. Other companies have turned to solutions like Yammer External Groups for patient communication, Microsoft Teams for internal office communication and document sharing, Slack and other instant messaging software to stem the flow. According to a recent TELUS report, tools like these ones can reduce email volume by as much as 40%.

Most companies at the very least publish email policy or etiquette guidelines for staff. I’ve been amused recently by a number of articles listing the major pet peeves of email users; here are some favourites:

  • Not entering a Subject line – making the email impossible to find later
  • Replying to an email and changing the topic completely – usually best to start a new email but at least add a word or a phrase to the end of the existing Subject line to inform readers of the change
  • Threadjacking – changing a Subject line to start a new conversation – please start a new email!
  • Using non-embedded logos and other graphics in a signature that come through as attachments, or little red exes
  • Intricate fonts, different coloured fonts, emoji overkill, SMS shorthand, excessive punctuation!!!!! None of these belong in business emails
  • PEOPLE WHO SHOUT AT ME
  • Messages that go on and on and say little or nothing
  • Messages that are so short they actually say nothing
  • People who can’t seem to master a professional tone; their writing is either far too casual or unnecessarily stiff
  • Those who mark everything urgent. Wolf-cryers
  • Asking for proof of receipt (unless it’s a summons, it’s insulting)
  • Replying to all when not warrented, cc’ing without approval, bcc’ing…

I wonder how much more work could get done in a day if email management took even half the time it currently does for most. If we effectively put to use the tools, technologies, approaches, and best practices that have been developed to reduce emails in the first place, we’d all be doing ourselves a favour. It’s worth the experiment.