Could your practice benefit from a digital makeover?

As pioneers of practice management software about to celebrate our 40th anniversary in Canada, we are very gratified to see how technology has evolved to support every aspect of the dental practice. Today, the office that is operating without digital support is the rare exception.

On the surface, this is a great achievement. Yet when I dig deeper, as I frequently do in business development initiatives, I am surprised at how few dental teams are actually utilizing their technology investment to its full potential. Some may be limited by their choice of simple software that satisfies only basic tasks like scheduling. But many others have invested in more robust software that is just waiting to be optimized.

Wherever you sit, it’s time to seriously examine the state of your technology. Increased competition; heightened consumer expectations; the quest for planet-friendly, paperless solutions; cybercrime… these are among today’s external pressures that will continue to impact your success. For a dental practice more specifically:

  • The security and privacy of your data is more important than ever, yet has never been more at risk.
  • Cloud computing presents the opportunity for huge advances in the speed, mobility, reliability, and storage capacity of data. It can be more cost effective and quicker to deploy while improving the efficiency of backup and recovery.
  • Integrated communication portals enable amazing levels of practice/patient interactivity, heightening patient engagement and loyalty.
  • From a reporting and analytical perspective, your practice data can offer a wealth of valuable insights. Awareness and measurement of your KPIs – Key Performance Indicators – is a gateway to continuous improvement.

If you are not yet tapping into the power of your software, maybe it’s time for a digital makeover… let’s talk! On Monday, June 26th, ABELDent Inc. is partnering with Microsoft Canada to present an evening of insight that has the potential to transform the success of your practice. Join us in person or online for this event by pre-registering today.

Pharming and Phishing and Smishing… what next? (re-post)

It seems a week does not go by without news of another hacking incident or privacy breach. Cybercrime is here to stay. I thought it would be helpful to re-post this article from last year to reinforce the importance of cyber vigilance in the practice management arena.

Pharming and Phishing and Smishing… what next?

Three words that did not even exist a couple of years ago – at least not spelled like this – are now mainstream threats. They’re right up there with spam and scams, spoofing and spyware, hacking and botnets, malware, viruses, worms, ransomware, Trojan horses and, yes, WiFi eavesdropping.

I’ve already written about some of these types of cybercrime in this space, in particular the ones that have been known to affect small businesses with big sensitivity to database privacy, like dental practices.

But online fraud is everywhere. I used to think that it was only the naïve non-digital-savvy individuals who got themselves duped with such schemes. No longer. Hackers and scammers are getting more and more sophisticated. Like the recent spate of official-sounding telephone calls directing taxpayers to a spoofed Canada Revenue Agency website to pay re-assessed taxes – that ploy would make most of us sit up and take notice.

So when I came across the Get Cyber Safe website sponsored by Public Safety Canada, I double-checked to make sure it was legit. The site is part of a national public awareness campaign around Internet security and online protection. It is full of great information and advice, from tips to safely dispose of your tech devices to precautions to take when an employee leaves your company. There’s even a downloadable Get Cyber Safe Guide for Small and Medium Businesses and a self-assessment tool that could be quite handy resources.

www.getcybersafe.ca

Even if you don’t have time today to check out this site, at least bookmark it for future reference.

We all need to learn to be skeptical – even if it’s against our nature. We must learn to detect fraud and protect ourselves, our businesses, our patients, our employees and our families from becoming victims of cybercrime.

Ps: I had to look up ‘’smishing’’: it is ‘phishing’ for private information using SMS (texting) rather than email.