Are you Living your Vision, Mission and Values?

Audience fragmentation is a challenge that marketers have been grappling with for some time. Consumers can no longer be pigeon-holed into a few contact channels: They are increasingly adventurous, capricious, demanding, and armed with information. Just when you think you’ve built a toehold on a social media site like Facebook, the early adopters have already moved on to the next shiny thing.

Consumers want to understand what you stand for, but they also want you to understand what makes them tick. Increasingly, they expect responsiveness, interactivity and customization.

Dental professionals cannot ignore these trends. The current environment for attracting new patients is competitive to the point where clinical expertise and caring service are just part of the equation.

Market differentiation is necessary to fuel momentum. A practice that can define and clearly articulate what unique advantages they offer to their patients can often move the needle from surviving to thriving.

In ABELDent’s Practice Management by Objectives™ methodology, the development of a meaningful Value Proposition is fundamental to a solid business strategy. There’s a mutual underpinning between the Value Proposition, the Mission, the Vision and Values statements, and the Operating Plan. Learn more about Practice Management by Objectives™.

If you have not yet articulated your thinking on this, your Mission is a good place to start. It should describe:
a. Why you are in business
b. Who you serve
c. How your practice adds value or improves the life of those you serve

Next, explore your Vision:
a. How do you define success, both short and long term
b. How will you and your practice improve, grow and prosper over the next several years

Finally, identify your Values:
a. What’s your patient care philosophy
b. What principles and qualities are important to you
c. What behaviours model those principles

This exercise is both a personal exploration and a team exercise. In order to create a shared vision and encourage buy-in, all staff and stakeholders could be involved. Your operating processes, practices and systems evolve from this foundation. And so will the emotional connections you create with your existing and new patients.

If you build it, will they call?

The current thinking on website design seems unanimous. From our in-house Webmaster (my go-to resource of choice) to an array of trusted Consultants with many an article read along the way: A business website should be designed for prospects.

It’s not all about you — even though the “About Us” tab on the majority of sites appears FIRST on navigation bar! It’s about what you can do for them.

It’s not even primarily for your existing customers. Your current patients should ideally get exclusive access to a customized extranet or personalized communication through a portal. “Already a patient? Click here.”

Your website exists as an information destination for new leads and a powerful mechanism to convert these leads into patients. It’s digital real estate to present your Value Proposition. Its raison d’être is to get your phone to ring, email to ping or online chat to buzz.

So if your website doesn’t already have a prominent and compelling call to action on every page, you’re ready for a refresh.

I’ve compiled some tips through the above-mentioned research. Whether you’re tackling your first website or an upgrade to an existing one, I hope you and your website designer find these helpful.

1. Yup. A compelling call to action on every page

2. Craft a powerful expression of your practice’s Value Proposition and Positioning Statement. You want visitors to clearly understand what makes you stand out from your competition

3. Offer a clear, accurate description of your services

4. Plan a layout that follows current conventions. Visitors don’t want to work too hard to get the information they need

a. Place your logo where they expect to see it: in the upper left corner
b. Put your contact info in a prominent spot
c. Structure your site with a top or side navigation bar with intuitive menus and titles
d. Offer your key info above the fold – don’t make them scroll
e. Use colours that reflect your practice personality

5. Keep your copy short, and focus on the benefits to the reader

a. Use concise, plain language to express your unique strengths and grab your reader’s attention
b. Make a list of keywords – the terms that resonate with your desired audience – and use them frequently
c. Express all your features as benefits. This is a practised skill – it may take some time, thought and brainstorming
d. Create “read more” links so your reader can choose when to scan and when to delve
e. BUT avoid the tendency to bury good info under too many clicks!

6. Testimonials. True sentiments from real patients help build trust, especially when they’re in synch with your Value Proposition. Make sure the stories focus on the patient experience and service, avoiding clinical commentary

7. Vary the way you deliver your information. Some people like words, others like facts and figures. Infographics and pie charts are great for this. Most of us like photos to help visualize ourselves as a patient in your practice

8. When you get to the “About Us” section, strive for a personal touch. Using “I” and “We” is one simple way to create warmth in your copy. Photos of the practitioners, teams and practice environment add depth

9. Search Engine Optimization is vital. Use your keywords in your copy and in your page titles. Again, brainstorming can help you and your team figure out what words and strings of words your ideal prospects are likely to enter into a mainstream search engine like Google or Bing or into a specialized dental directory

10. Make sure your site is mobile friendly. A responsive design will adjust the view to best usability on a smart phone, tablet or computer screen. It’s easy to check this: just click https://www.google.ca/webmasters/tools/mobile-friendly/ and enter your URL

This list just scratches the surface of a very interesting topic. The next level involves setting up benchmarks and analytics to assess your site’s effectiveness. You and your website designer likely have much advice and many more tips… I’d love to hear about them and share with our clients! Drop me a line at angela@abelhealthgroup.com. I’ve started to build it – it’s your turn to connect.

Sometimes it’s okay to break the rules

Every new patient starts out as a stranger. So we need to set aside the rule our parents taught us: it is okay – even wise – to talk to strangers.

How are new callers to your practice treated? Do they receive a warm, welcoming greeting and patient, empathetic service… or are they put on hold and made to feel as though they’re interrupting someone’s too-busy day?

Because we rarely get a second chance to make a first impression, our front line staff must be equipped, trained and coached to be a one-person welcoming committee. Consider these techniques:

1. Put a Smile in your Voice
One of our consultants told me that many years ago, as Supervisor of a Hotline Centre with a major insurance company, she had this little slogan affixed to every telephone handset. Corny as it may sound, a caller can tell when you are smiling. Good advice does not go out of style.

2. Perfect the Art of Listening
I frequently quote this line from the movie Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind: “Constantly talking isn’t necessarily communicating”. Listening carefully to your callers’ introductory words will guide the conversation and help you set a positive tone from the outset.

3. Be Prepared with a Front Line FAQ
Good service providers are definitely friendly. As important, though, is knowledge and the ability to accurately answer Frequently Asked Questions. A caller’s first question is usually the deal breaker: How soon can you see me? Are you good with children? Can you direct-bill my insurance company? What’s the earliest/latest appointment possible?

Beyond the first questions, staff should be able to recognize common symptoms, probe to fully understand the issue, confidently explain basic procedures, describe your services, and discuss insurance details.

4. Aim to Book an Appointment On the Spot
Like the old saying goes… Strike while the iron is hot! Your goal should be to get an appointment scheduled. Offering an appointment date that falls within 5 days increases the chance of getting the caller to join your practice.

Then, make the data collection process foolproof by creating and using a checklist: name, address and phone number; email address including permission to use it; reason for call/services of interest; preferred appointment times. (Better yet, take advantage of the new patient booking feature built into ABELDent!)

It is good practice to have a back-up available to manage callers if reception is busy with patients. Always ask permission to put someone on hold and then check back quickly. If the caller cannot be immediately served, promise to call back asap. Sitting on hold or waiting through transfers can feel like forever to a caller and lead to a hang-up.

Some people may advise that you ask the prospect how they found you. That is definitely good information to have, as it helps you measure and refine your marketing efforts. But do remember that this detail is for your benefit, not theirs. Respect that the caller’s time may be limited; you can always probe later.

When an appointment is scheduled, close the call by telling the caller that “the team is looking forward to meeting you”.

5. Keep Track of your Callers
If the caller is not ready to schedule right away, by offering an appointment you have opened the door to ask for their contact information and permission to stay in touch. Maintain a database of these prospects. Converting your strangers into patients may require a few calls or emails, maybe even a heads-up when you are offering any specials to your patient base. We all need reminders – some more than others.

The key is to drive home the importance of genuinely welcoming callers, showing interest, offering an immediate appointment and building relationships. I can still hear the words of a wise supervisor from early in my career: “A ringing telephone is not interrupting your work. It is your work.”

Don’t be a stranger.

Where do (new) patients come from?

Ah… the million dollar question. The question that gave birth to the multi-million dollar industry of sales and lead generation.

You may be operating a steady dental practice with loyal clients, great retention and satisfactory productivity and profitability. What a great achievement… kudos to you.

For all the other practices out there, increased growth through new patient acquisition is vital to the success and sustainability of their business. When TV spots, print ads and online campaigns like Google AdWords or website banners fall outside the limits of a modest advertising budget, how does a small-to-medium-sized practice effectively attract attention and draw new business?

Here are a few ideas:
Tap your existing patient database for referrals

There’s a great deal of trust that accompanies a personal recommendation. In many companies, referrals can account for one-third of all new business.

Every patient has immediate family members and friends, all consumers of dental services. But growing your business is not a top-of-mind priority for them. They require a nudge.

Happy clients refer new clients. So a) keep your patients happy; b) be assertive in asking for referrals; c) remind them frequently; and d) show your appreciation to encourage participation.

Optimize your website

Is your website helping you generate new leads? Are you taking advantage of Search Engine Optimization techniques to make sure that your business ranks as high as possible in keyword search results? I’ll dedicate a future post to this topic.

Think grassroots. Think local.

Your best pocket of potential is likely your own backyard. Direct Response initiatives and signage within your immediate neighbourhood can reinforce the convenience of your location to long-term residents and present a solution to newly arrived neighbours. You can create interest with special offers, postcards, door hangers, posters, fridge magnets, dental product samples…

These items can also attract attention when you get involved in events like school fairs and church functions or local mall and community centre gatherings. Sponsoring such events and local sports teams goes a long way in growing your word-of-mouth recognition. Or create an event for locals to drop in, meet and greet, qualify for a complimentary service or special incentive.

Fine-tune your reception process

What happens when your marketing efforts do work and a new prospect actually calls your office… huzzah! How attentive and welcoming is your staff? A harried, too-busy reception can be a huge turn-off. On the other hand, a telephone answered by a friendly, knowledgeable individual can have a dramatic impact on new client intake. Do you have an appropriate focus and process? (If not, follow this space for a future post.)

And finally, in the category of new business from not-so-new customers:

Look inside your “Million-dollar filing cabinet”

You may not think of your unscheduled recommended treatment as a marketing vehicle. But if your recommendations are growing mold in a filing cabinet, despite the best of intentions, they represent lost revenue. Follow-up and digital pokes can help you realize organic growth.